TRENDS TO FOLLOW FOR GETTING BEST BUSINESS LOGOS

1) SOCIAL MEDIA:

Best logos can be defined as if we talk social media like Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and there are many more if you just show the logo to anyone they easily tell what applications or product is this even if they are not the user of that specific product or business.

So now a day's graphic designers take help from social media platform where take can take some ideas how to create an ideal brand.

Most customers who buy promotional items use them to promote their brand or business. However, in more recent branding endeavors, business owners have begun using custom products to promote their social media business platforms! Just be aware that each social network has their own set of rules detailing how businesses are allowed to use their trademarked images.

2) COLOURS:

Selecting a color palette is one of the most impactful choices you can make while developing your brand. Choosing the right logo colors can highlight your business’ strengths and help you attract the right customers. And, as you might guess, the wrong combination can have the reverse effect. Everyone has heard of color psychology, which tells us that colors impact our emotions and behaviors. Yellow is cheerful (because the sun is bright and yellow!) and green is calming (like lying in the grass and looking up at a bunch of leaves is peaceful).

Remember that you are not limited to one color. If what you choose Best Logo designs to emphasize about your business is its variety of products (like eBay) multiple colors are a great way to show that diversity.

Similarly, choosing two or three specific colors can highlight what makes you unique. The original Coors banquet logo pairs a golden brown—which not only is the color of beer but is a combination of masculine brown and affordable yellow—with a mature blue wordmark. This is perfect for their target customer. Don’t be afraid to experiment before making your final logo color choices. See what works and what doesn’t. “It’s about the feeling, mood, and image that your brand creates. This is what plays a big role in persuasion, so colors come into play when they can be utilized to match your brand’s desired personality” says Matthew Roda in his recent article about psychology of colors.

Red

The universal sign of excitement, passion and anger. Is your brand loud, playful, youthful or modern? Think red. More mature, classic or serious? Red may not be for you.

Orange

An invigorating, playful color. Go orange to stand out from the crowd. It’s used less often than red, but still packs an energetic punch.

Yellow

Accessible, sunshiny friendliness. Yellow exudes cheer, and your brand will radiate an affordable, youthful energy. Nobody puts yellow in a corner!

Green

The ultimate in versatility, green isn’t linked with many brand personality traits, but it has strong cultural associations. Are you in finance? Gardening? Consider going green.

Blue

The classic king of colors, blue appears in over half of all logos. As it symbolizes trustworthiness and maturity, true blue will make sure you’re taken seriously.

Purple

Where the rainbow gets luxurious. Paint with purple to appear simultaneously cutting-edge and wise. There’s just a hint of femininity in there too.

Pink

Nothing says “girly” quite like pink. But it’s more versatile than that. From pastel rose to neon magenta, pick pink for a modern, youthful, luxurious look.

Brown

what can brown do for you? Make your brand appear rugged, masculine and serious. Brown is much underutilized, so you’ll stand out from the competition.

Black

Black is the new black. Want to look slick, modern and luxurious? Time to go black. Rather be economical and affordable? Stay away from the dark side.

White

The absence of color. White is youthful and economical, but can work for almost any brand. As a neutral color, consider white as a secondary accent.

3) LANGUAGE:

Remember that you are not limited to one color. If what you choose to emphasize about your business is its variety of products (like eBay) multiple colors are a great way to show that diversity. Similarly, choosing two or three specific colors can highlight what makes you unique. The original Coors banquet logo pairs a golden brown—which not only is the color of beer but is a combination of masculine brown and affordable yellow—with a mature blue word mark.

This is perfect for their target customer. Don’t be afraid to experiment before making your final logo color choices. See what works and what doesn’t. It’s about the feeling, mood, and image that your brand creates. This is what plays a big role in persuasion, so language come into play when they can be utilized to match your brand’s desired personality.




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